Adventures in Amazing Copywriting #4 – Variations on a Theme

eggspectation.jpgToday’s adventure comes to us from Eggspectation – a theme restaurant where the egg is front and center. Just look at their mission statement:

We are a company committed to innovation and eggcellence. Meeting your “eggspectations” is part of our everyday eggsperience, striving to surpass them is what makes us “eggstraordinary.” On this notion, we strive to achieve the best possible in food quality & service while maintaining an overall relaxed & pleasant atmosphere. Welcome to what we call “le cirque des oeufs” an all-day eggsperience.

Looking around at the eclectic decor you can see how the egg theme is all around you through sculptures, paintings & knick-knacks. Even the backs of the chairs bear a familiar oval shape.

The menu is chocked full of continued creative copy with items such as:

– Muffin Eggplosion

– Egg-Chilada

– Eggcitement (French Toast)

– Eggsuberant (Breakfast Combination Platter)

– Uneggspected (Steak & Eggs)

Why this works:

1. Consistency – Using the same word over and over and over again helps solidify your brand in the minds of your customer. Repetition leads to recognition which leads to referrals.

2. Creativity – Clever copy causes clients to stop and think (and maybe even chuckle). Using words in a new way is a great way to help you stand out from the crowd.

3. Capitalize – Creating your own words gives you terms that you can trademark.

Everything I learned about sales I learned from working in a restaurant

waitress-cartoon.gifThanks to Jeffery who reminded me that everything I learned about sales I learned from working in a restaurant.

In order to put myself through college (and I can proudly say I graduated without taking out a dime in student loans) I waited tables and bartended. Here’s just a snippet of the lessons I learned:

  • Engaging in quality conversations with strangers is the key to being remembered.
  • Exceeding expectations is more important than simply meeting them.
  • Your income is directly proportionate to your effort and personality.
  • Upselling is an effective way to increase your bottom line.
  • Getting along with a mix of personalities is an inevitable part of life.
  • Put out fires with they are small – ignoring a bad situation only makes it worse.
  • Anticipate your client’s needs.
  • Thorough product knowledge is key.
  • Prepare for objections and have prepared responses.
  • Be able to think on your feet.
  • Learn to ask for help – your service will suffer if you are stubborn.
  • Be honest – if you lie, the customer will always find out.
  • Underpromise and overdeliver.
  • A smile goes a long way.
  • Learn to let go the things that you can’t control.
  • Consistently do your best – at the end of the day, that’s all that matters.
  • You can’t please everyone – but you can at least try to.
  • Treat every client like they are the only one you are working with.
  • Be yourself.

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Andrea Morris is a marketing coach who specializes in helping visionaries, entrepreneurs, consultants and small businesses use high-ROI strategies to get the right message to the right people. For more information, please visit writeideasmarketing.com

The Importance of Customer Complaints

glass-of-wine.gifI have a friend who bartends at a local restaurant. Sometimes I like to go and have a glass of wine while he’s working to catch up on life. Last week, while enjoying a nice Shiraz, I overheard the owner of the restaurant complaining to the manager about a customer.

“I can’t believe that woman! She came up and complained about how we use too much butter on the vegetables. It’s a restaurant – of course there’s butter. If she didn’t want so much on there, she should have told her server.”

This got me thinking. It’s easy for us, no matter which industry we serve, to complain about our customers who complain. Instead, I think we should be thanking them.

A customer who complains has the guts and the brand loyalty to tell you exactly what you need to do to meet their expectations. Think of it this way….

That same woman could have easily walked out of the restaurant, not saying a word to the owner. Then, since her expectations were not met, she would have most likely spread negative word of mouth, bashing the restaurant and their butter-happy ways to 10 of her friends.

What if this restaurant adopted the mindset of “complaints are just a form of feedback.” The decision to make a change still rests in the hands of the owner – only now he is equipped with the knowledge of what his customers really want.

Just food for thought.

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Andrea Morris is a marketing coach who specializes in helping visionaries, entrepreneurs, consultants and small businesses use high-ROI strategies to get the right message to the right people. For more information, please visit writeideasmarketing.com