Humble Thoughts On Blogs, Social Networks, and other New Media Stuff

Last week Geoff Livingston and I participated in Smart Business Ideas(TM) Magazine’s Ready, Set, Grow event where the topic focused around blogs. Since our presentation I’ve been receiving e-mails from those in attendance regarding my opinion on social media. So here it is – humbly submitted, of course.

Who should blog?
Blogging is not for everyone. Keep in mind that although the operating costs are minimal, you still have to invest a significant amount of time to research, write and promote a blog. In my opinion, here are the three things you must have to start a blog:

1. Passion for a subject – I’m passionate about marketing. I could talk about this stuff all day long. To me, it’s easy to find stuff to write about because marketing is a topic to which I naturally gravitate. And you can tell just from reading my blog that this is really my life. My personality comes through because I’m passionate. Now, if I were to write a blog about, say, accounting (not a subject where I naturally gravitate) because someone said I “should” it wouldn’t have nearly the same effect because every time I would sit down to write a post I would hate it. Inevitably (if I had a blog about a subject I wasn’t passionate about) I would try to take shortcuts by reading and repeating what everyone else is saying without interjecting my own thoughts. At that point I would simply be regurgitating instead of contributing positively to a conversation.

2. Time – While the actual overhead expenses of maintaining a blog are (generally) low or no cost, you can’t forget about the time it takes to maintain a blog. Keep in mind there is more to blogging than simply sitting down to write.

A. Research – Reading related blogs so you know what’s going on around you takes time.

B. Writing – Hashing out your idea into a cohesive thought takes time.

C. Editing – Revising your cohesive thought so you don’t sound like a bumbling idiot takes time.

D. Analyzing – Checking your stats, referrals, and understanding what your readers like takes time.

E. Promoting – Registering at Technorati, putting widgets, continually adding to your blogroll, responding to comments and the thousands of other ways you can promote your blog takes time.

If you blog once a week, plan on investing at least 5 hours a week (especially in the beginning when you are getting everything set up) to produce a quality blog. For each additional post per week – add 2 hours. (Oh, and for those people who tell you they crank out a post in 10 minutes – I don’t buy it. Quality writing takes quality time.)

3. Dedication – I really liked how Geoff put it in his presentation last week – “Bloggers must be sharks. Not in the sense that they are aggressive – but in the sense that if they stop swimming, they die. Blogs where the author stops posting die.” With that in mind, you must commit to posting on a regular schedule. Yes, it’s tough – but it’s the way it is.

Facebook vs. Myspace vs. LinkedIn
Social networks are popping up everywhere. Yes, they can be amazing business tools. But they’re kind of like address books – they’re only as useful as the information in it. My advice? Don’t spread yourself too thin. Pick one and go deep. Don’t bother with other ones until you’ve mastered the first. If you’re new at all this, I personally think LinkedIn is designed to be the most effective in a business setting (and is the most intuitive to set up in my opinion). Myspace is more personal. Facebook is a little bit of both.

Widgets, Twitter, Second Life & Other Randoms
This July at the New Media Nouveaux Conference, speaker Brian Williams mentioned how learning about all this new Web 2.0 stuff is like “drinking from a fire hose.” And it’s an accurate description. It can be overwhelming, especially when you feel pressured to participate in every single type of tool available. Here’s how I see it – there are enough new tools out there to keep you busy for 27 lifetimes. So, if the premise of the strategy doesn’t feel right, you shouldn’t feel like you “have to” participate. I don’t use Twitter or Second Life because at this point in time, it isn’t a good return on my time investment. As I said before – it’s more effective to go deep into one tool instead of spreading yourself thinly across many.

I know my opinions are more down-to-earth than most – but hey, it’s what I think. What about you?

5 thoughts on “Humble Thoughts On Blogs, Social Networks, and other New Media Stuff

  1. Andrea,

    It has been sometime since we have visited. I always enjoyed your blogs.

    In your message today I would have to add a point you missed. When a person has a very small niche market blogging and internet marketing may be a total waste of time.

    A person may have the passion, time and fortitude to be everywhere all the time but if they are blogging on something that is of no interest to anyone on the internet or, even worse, if their market is offline and not online, they will become very frustrated after spending a lot of time blogging to no avail.

    My suggestion would be to not fall for the hype that blogging will attract business to your interest. Check out your market first and make sure what you are offering is needed online or at least there are enough people who know what you are blogging about in the blogsphere before spending a lot of time to find out what you are blogging about is not going to get you anywhere online.

    Let me know how I can help

  2. Absolutely!!!! If you’re marketing to an audience that isn’t online – it doesn’t make sense to blog. Too often people forget that a business blog is a marketing tool – not an online diary. And in order for it to be effective, it’s all about ROI!!

  3. Andrea,

    A couple of points: First, great point about time. I have two blogs and I find I spend about 12-14 hours per week on them total. Starting a blog is like having a child. It always has to be fed. If you don’t post for a couple of days, you feel it calling you, and it starts starving (readership falls off).

    Second, blogs are not all about getting business online. I use my blogs to gain credibility and to stimulate my thinking. It has worked, and as a byproduct I have gained some business online.

  4. This was an excellent post that I wish every business person could read. Social media is the new thing that every business person seems to know about, but they just aren’t sure how and if they should use it. Too often I hear from people working in marketing about clients that come to them saying, “yeah and we want one of those blog things.” It’s said as an after thought. People don’t seem to understand the time commitment social media takes.

  5. Thanks for your comment, Jay & Tayna. You’re right – a blog is not a traditional way to earn online revenue. If that’s your only goal – it’s probably not the best marketing tool for you. However, if your goal is to gain credibility, stimulate thinking, or become connected with a group of like-minded individuals then it’s worth it. 🙂 Plus – it’s just flat out a lot of work and people tend to forget that.

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